Tanzania, Acacia Hills | Washed, Geisha (6860338266310)
Tanzania, Acacia Hills | Washed, Geisha (6860338266310)

Tanzania, Acacia Hills | Washed, Geisha

Regular price Dhs. 122.00
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Shipping calculated at checkout.
5 in stock

Size
Processing
Washed
Harvest
Oct – Nov 2020
Altitude
1900–1925 m
Variety
Geisha
Scoring
86

Country: Tanzania

Region: Arusha

Owner: Leon and Aideen Christianakis

Taste Notes: Wild Berry Marmalade, Sweet Cherries, Dried Oranges, Black Tea.

Roast: Filter

 

Tanzania

Coffee’s roots in Tanzania can be traced via narrative history back to the Haya tribe of Northwest Tanzania in the 16th century. Following German and then British colonial rule, the Tanzanian coffee industry has undergone many transformations and adjustments to create the most equal, profitable, and high-quality coffee possible. 

Coffee in Tanzania was grown almost exclusively in the Northern part for a long time. The Kilimanjaro, Arusha, Tarime, Kagera, Kigoma, and Karatu/Ngorongoro regions are known for their ideal Arabica growing conditions. At the time, coffee production was so concentrated in the north that Moshi, a northern municipality, was the only hub for all coffee milling and sales.

Operations in Moshi grew to massive proportions in the 1950s and early-1960s. Hence during the post-war decades, Tanzania, Kenya, and Burundi were under British rule—Moshi was the second milling and sales hub (after Nairobi, Kenya) for British coffee production.

Coffee cultivation has extended southwards in recent years. In addition to the northern historical coffee growing regions, coffee is now also grown in the south—in Ruvuma and Mbeya/Mbozi. Most Southern expansion of coffee growing occurred in the 1970s and 1980s and was encouraged by two projects supported by European backers. In an ironic twist, today, 75 to 85% of total coffee production in Tanzania comes from farms in the south.

Coffee’s roots in Tanzania can be traced via narrative history back to the Haya tribe of Northwest Tanzania in the 16th century. Following German and then British colonial rule, the Tanzanian coffee industry has undergone many transformations and adjustments to create the most equal, profitable, and high-quality coffee possible. 

Coffee in Tanzania was grown almost exclusively in the Northern part for a long time. The Kilimanjaro, Arusha, Tarime, Kagera, Kigoma, and Karatu/Ngorongoro regions are known for their ideal Arabica growing conditions. At the time, coffee production was so concentrated in the north that Moshi, a northern municipality, was the only hub for all coffee milling and sales.

Operations in Moshi grew to massive proportions in the 1950s and early-1960s. Hence during the post-war decades, Tanzania, Kenya, and Burundi were under British rule—Moshi was the second milling and sales hub (after Nairobi, Kenya) for British coffee production.

Coffee cultivation has extended southwards in recent years. In addition to the northern historical coffee growing regions, coffee is now also grown in the south—in Ruvuma and Mbeya/Mbozi. Most Southern expansion of coffee growing occurred in the 1970s and 1980s and was encouraged by two projects supported by European backers. In an ironic twist, today, 75 to 85% of total coffee production in Tanzania comes from farms in the south.

The farm

The view from Acacia Hills Estate is surreal! The northern border of the estate lies along the southwestern side of Mount Oldeani. Slopes of this hill drain water into Lake Eyasi, a key saltwater lake on the outskirts of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area and Serengeti National Park. From the edge of the farm, you can see the rim of Ngorongoro crater, an ancient collapsed volcano whose fertile valley is now home to dozens of different animal species: from African elephants to lions, rhinoceros, leopards and giraffes.

The land upon which the estate sits previously consisted of 4 smaller farms, first cultivated by German settlers in the 1930s and 40s. In the 1960s, those four farms were united in one and named the Acacia Hills Estate. The estate has been producing coffee ever since - a total of over 50 years.

In 2007, Leon and Aideen Christianakis, local Tanzanian coffee farmers, partnered with an American roaster to purchase and upgrade the estate to focus on specialty coffee production. Today, Leon and Aideen incorporate diverse practices, including - soil analysis, managed shade and processing methods - into their coffee production to ensure the highest possible quality. 

  Farmer and farm

Mery Yolanda Daza inherited the El Mandarino farm from her father, Alfonso Daza. As children, Mery and her brother helped their father with coffee growing, harvest and small production work. 

Now she can say that not only herself but all members of her family are coffee growers. All coffee lots coming from El Mandarino and other Merys farms show the great outcome of three generations working in the field together. El Mandarino is a 1.7 ha large farm with ⅔ covered in the coffee trees from which more than 50% classifies as semi shadow and shadow grown.

In future, she is planning to use new and intriguing processing methods for her lots and produce even higher quality coffee beans. One of her dreams is to have a large coffee company where she could employ people from the whole Cauca, Bolívar region in coffee production.

Geisha

Geisha is a variety that first was documented around 1930 in the Ethiopian village of Geisha. Then it was transported to the Kenya coffee research centre. After research, the very first experimental lots were planted in farms in Uganda and Tanzania. 

It started its way in Central and South America from Costa Rica when in 1950 countries coffee research centre CATIE began to cultivate this variety. Geisha was resistant to coffee leaf rust, which was a massive problem those days. But due to small yield and weak cup results, other coffee varieties were found more suitable among farmers. 

Popularity for this variety started in 2004 when a Geisha lot from a Panamanian farm won the “Best of Panama” auction and received the hitherto unheard-of price of more than 40 euros per kilo. Due to its floral and sweet taste profile, it is grown worldwide, and the price for it keeps growing together with the demand for it.

The lot

The farm grows mainly Bourbon and Kent varieties and has been experimenting with the potential of Geisha, Pacamara and Castillo in the Tanzanian climate. The estate boasts the highest altitude of any coffee farm in the region. To fully maximize the potential of these varieties, has planted Geisha and Pacamara at the highest altitude on the farm - about 1,900 meters above sea level.

When the cherries are ready for harvesting, they are selectively handpicked and delivered to the farm’s onsite wet mill, where they are de-pulped. The coffee is then dry fermented for 12-18 hours (depending on ambient temperature) before being washed in clean water and then laid to dry on African raised beds for 10-14 days. Traditionally, the estate dries parchment directly in the sun. Recently Leon and Aideen and their team started to experiment with using shade netting to slow drying times so that coffee can develop longer. After the drying, coffee is packed in bags and is ready to be sent out.

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